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Swimming with mantas, Yap, Micronesia

 

 

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Santorini Photo Shoot, Greece

Sunset over sea, Santorini Island, Greece
Santorini sunset, Greece

I’ve always liked the edge. As a kid I would often be called back from exploring some crumbling ridge to take a peek over the other side. So it should be no surprise that I fell in love with Santorini, a Greek island born of mythology and rich in geology. Legend tells of a land gifted to the Argonauts by sea god Triton. The first settlers called this place Kallisti, ‘the most beautiful one’. It developed as a sophisticated outpost of Minoan civilisation until 1600 BC, when one of the world’s largest volcanic eruptions tore the island apart. A tsunami raced and raged across the sea…perhaps claiming Plato’s ancient Atlantis beneath the waves?

Blue domed churches, Oia village, Santorini, Greece
Famous blue domed churches, Oia

The draw of modern-day Santorini is in no doubt. This is the Greece of a 1,000 picture-perfect postcards. A volcanic jewel in the Aegean Sea crowned by whitewashed villages. One such village is Oia, home to blue domed churches and traditional Greek windmills converted into unique holiday accommodations. Located at the Northern tip of the island, Oia is famous for it’s sunsets and it’s where I stayed for my Santorini photo shoot. Traditional cave houses appear as bites in the caldera cliff and hotels cling to the rim, competing for ever-superior sea views. Nameless streets and numerous steps link the viewpoint of Oia’s old fort down to the shores of Amoudi Bay. This tiny fishing port offers fresh seafood…and the chance to swim in the flooded caldera of a resting volcano.

Traditional Greek windmill at night, Oia, Santorini
Traditional Greek windmill illuminated at night, Oia

Santorini is a ring of crater islands through which Mediterranean cruise ships sail. The main island is Thira and it’s capital town of Fira is where boatloads of tourists first set foot – helped from ship to shops by a cable car or donkey ride. From this cliff top tourist town it is possible to walk all the way back to Oia. A coastal path rewards hikers with stunning sea vistas, passing whitewashed villas and the roof top rowing boat of Homeric Poems Hotel in Firostefani.

Old rowing boat on roof terrace, Firostefani, Santorini
Boat on roof and caldera view, Firostefani

From Firostefani, with it’s caldera view of volcanic Nea Kameni island, I continued on to the medieval Skaros Rock, site of a long lost castle fortress. Within a stones throw of this rocky headland is the luxurious Hotel White in Imerovigli. Infinity pools and hammocks aside, it was enough to admire that same million dollar view from the path, stood in trusty trail worn sandals! Itchy Feet didn’t make it straight back to Oia that night, distracted instead by fine food at the Blue Note Restaurant…where a chilled glass of wine and the Santorini sun sank together.

Hotel White, Imerovigli, Santorini
Luxury Hotel White, Imerovigli

For such a small island, Santorini holds many charms. Travel inland from the balcony-clad coast and you will find a slower, less material way of life. Journey past vineyards to the hillside village of Pyrgos. This fortified settlement of churches and mansions has panoramic, coast to coast views overlooking the grape-growing landscape. Or step through the arched entrance of Emporio Castle into a miniature maze of twisting tunnels and narrow alleys that hide a tumble of medieval dwellings built tightly together to protect from pirates.

Whitewashed chimneys, Pyrgos village, Santorini
Whitewashed chimneys, Pyrgos village

Santorini often features in the top 10 lists of travel destinations, best island holidays and romantic escapes. Plan a visit, and find out why!

See more pictures of Oia village and Santorini sunsets over at itchyfeetphotography.com.

Iron Men Sculptures, Another Place, Crosby, UK

Another Place, Iron Men statues by Antony Gormley, Crosby beach, UK

A few miles up the coast from Liverpool is Another Place – an art installation by Antony Gormley consisting of 100 life-size statues facing out to sea. These iron men face a daily battle against wind and sea, succumbing to each incoming tide.

In the artists words: “Another Place harnesses the ebb and flow of the tide to explore man’s relationship with nature. The seaside is a good place to do this. Here time is tested by tide, architecture by the elements and the prevalence of sky seems to question the earth’s substance. In this work human life is tested against planetary time. This sculpture exposes to light and time the nakedness of a particular and peculiar body. It is no hero, no ideal, just the industrially reproduced body of a middle-aged man trying to remain standing and trying to breathe, facing a horizon busy with ships moving materials and manufactured things around the planet.”

I wanted to express this idea of movement with some long exposure photography. To achieve this I used a neutral density filter that blocks out light and forces the shutter to remain open for longer. Combined with a remote release, the above image was taken with an exposure of 7 seconds – smoothing out the incoming waves and giving the water a glassy appearance.

See more images of Antony Gormley sculptures at Itchy Feet Photography.

Iron Man statue by Antony Gormley, Another Place, Crosby beach, UK

Equipment

Canon 5D Mark II
Canon 28-70mm
Manfrotto 441 Carbon Fibre Tripod
Hahnel GigaT Pro II Wireless Remote Control
Hoya ND400 Neutral Density (ND) Filter
ND Exposure Chart
Tide Times

‘Keep Off The Grass’, Oxford University, England

'Please Keep Off The Grass' sign on lawn of Oriel College, Oxford University, England, UK

Compared to my own patch of green, the Oxford University lawns are kept annoyingly immaculate. But even polite signs asking people to keep off the grass don’t always work – several tourists merrily ran across to take close-up pictures of this sign!

The above image was taken in the quad of Oriel College, Oxford and has been licensed for textbook use.

Inca steps, Huayna Picchu, Peru

Ancient ruins of Machu Picchu, Huayna Picchu in background, Peru

The classic view of Machu Picchu, Peru is seen from a small stone building known as the Watchman’s Hut. The towering peak in the background of most pictures is Huayna Picchu and, for anyone with the energy, this mountain offers it’s own unique vantage point over the ancient ruins. The final challenge on nearing the summit is to squeeze through a narrow gap in the rock, up a short series of carved stone steps…

Inca steps leading to the summit of Huayna Picchu, Peru

Machu Picchu from the summit of Huayna Picchu

My image of the Inca carved steps has been licensed for a German travel guide.

Dead Woman’s Pass, Inca Trail, Peru

View from summit of Dead Woman's Pass, Andes Mountains, Peru

Here lies the highest point of the Inca Trail to Machu Picchu, Peru; the mountain pass of Abra Warmiwanuska – more unnervingly known as Dead Woman’s Pass. I was hiking in the Andes with two couples, one English, the other Canadian, all with a medical background. Lucky really – because I faced this climb with a body numbed by altitude sickness. Photographs were far from my mind when staggering up above the clouds at 4,215 m (13,800 ft). The reward however, on reaching the summit of this torturous stone staircase, is one of raw nature and ragged mountain peaks – and was suitably breathtaking.

The above image has sold for reproduction in a Frommer’s travel guide to Peru. A second picture from the summit of Dead Woman’s Pass, showing a lone porter starting his mountain descent, accompanies a recent article in the Telegraph newspaper.

Porters climbing Dead Womans Pass, Inca Trail to Machu Picchu, Andes, Peru

Toritos de Pucara, Peru

Toritos de Pucara, Little Bulls on house roof, Sacred Valley, Peru

A pair of small ceramic figures can occasionally be seen perched on the roof of houses in the Sacred Valley of Peru. Toritos de Pucara, or Little Bulls, are placed on rooftops as a symbol of good luck and prosperity.

This image sold for reproduction in a text and e-book.

Visit Itchyfeetphotography.com for more images of Peru.

Toritos de Pucara or Little Bulls, Peru, a good luck charm on house roof